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20130228
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KQED (PBS) 15
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
to survive a crisis we know it is not good for us but it is not fun, but why are so many people doing it? fledglingntry's democracy struggles to survive. we know that it is not good for us, but wire so many people doing it? welcome to our viewers on public television in america. america's drone program came -- undere nomination fire at the nomination hearing for john brennan. the man that president obama has tapped to be his next spy chief says that the white house goes through agony to make sure that there are no collateral deaths in these attacks. >> a panel of senators brimming with questions. barely a few words in, the first interruption but not from politicians. >> i am honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee. >> would you hold please? i will ask the police to please remove this woman. >> four times, protesters interrupted at the hearing. there was a vocal opposition to the program and to john brennan becoming the next director. he was questioned over his past involvement in enhance interrogation techniques. >> i've expressed my personal objections to my collea
to kill this man. he was also a u.s. citizen and the obama administration agreed to show congress the legal opinion justifies such attacks. the white house argues that from strikes effectively target america's enemies but critics cite heavy civilian casualties and the u.s. relies on them too much. >> the drone is the only weapon that really frightened insurgents. it is ineffective. we cannot possibly kill these people one at a time and expect to come out on top. >> they are clearly not invincible. iranian tv has shown these pictures that come from a u.s. surveillance drone they captured two years ago. it's interesting timing. >> with me here in the studio is a former adviser to president obama's special up is that it to afghanistan and pakistan. you understand this area of the world very closely. how important is this to the national security? >> it has killed a number of al qaeda leaders but it has not decimated the organization completely. it has pushed them to move into other areas of the middle east. also, at a very high political cost. it does cause an enormous amount of ange
? >> a number of people told us that you didn't make this a top priority. >> well, i'm sorry that they think that because i made it an incredibly top priority. >> that's lanny breuer, the assistant attorney general in charge of the criminal division at the justice department. a week after the frontline report, he stepped down and is now expected to return to private corporate practice, one more government appointee spinning through the lucrative revolving door between washington and wall street. that door could be a big reason why government treats the banks with kid gloves. a man who once worked for citigroup, jack lew, the president's chief of staff, has been picked to be the new treasury secretary. and mary jo white, the newly named head of the securities and exchange commission, is a chief litigator at a top law firm representing big investment banks like morgan stanley. with all this happening, it's time to talk with journalist matt taibbi. you've seen him on our broadcast before. a contributing editor at "rolling stone," he's been tracking the high crimes and misdemeanors of wall stree
. >> it is because television. >> hold it eleanor. >> the spectacle has lost a lot of the drama and dignity it used to have. he walks down that aisle and gets slaps and high fives. they should have had beyonce doing her number midway through it. >> every other president has walked down that aisle and i don't recall you complaining about it. >> it has lost dignity. >> ike and fdr didn't look like that. >> it is an american tradition and the fact the numbers were down is partly because people don't watch television like they used to. >> eleanor, how were obama's kneels son ratings -- neilsen ratings, the second lowest since they began taking measurement in 1993. the lowest since 2000 when bill you clinton's last drew an audience of 931.5 million. >> i think neilsen should start rating some of the social media sites and look at the exchanges between people who watched it. the american people who watched that and pick up portions that have, here our president is addressing concerns in their lives. i agree the big topics like the eu trade pac that is very important. but i don't think people in the count
viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house described it as a terrorist attack. the explosion occurred around 1:15 p.m. local time. afterward, police tried to hold back the crowd gathered outside the u.s. facility in the turkish capital. debris littered the street near a side entrance where the blast took place. emergency workers wheeled one of the injured into an awaiting ambulance. u.s. ambassador to turkey francis ricciardone spoke to reporters outside the embassy. >> right now, we are all dealing with our sadness at the loss of our fellow member of our embassy. we salute his bravery, his service to turkey and to turkish-american friendship. our hearts go out to his family. >> brown: in istanbul, prime minister recep tayyip erdogan called the bombing an "attack against peace in our country." and in washington, the state department's victoria
like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening, the u.s. government has been secretly targeting its enemies for years now, using unmanned aircraft to do the work. but this was the first week they said so out loud through a leaked white house white paper, that is, newly released legal memos and a high-profile confirmation for the next c.i.a. chief, a window was opened this week into how our wars are now waged, even when americans are the targets. >> we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there is an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we are doing so in a way that is consistent with federal and international law. gwen: the attorney general's words were carefully worded and john brennan, the likely new c.i.a. director was just as precise. >> the president has insisted that any actions we take will be legally grounded, will be thoroughly anchored in intelligence, will have the appropriate review process, approval process before any action is contemplated, including those actions that migh
and the air force base in the u.s. state of nevada. drones come in various shapes, sizes and weights. they are used for surveillance, disablement, and killing. and drones are increasingly ubiquitous. there are 64 drone bases spread across the united states alone, and the u.s. has other drone installations across the planet. africa is increasingly a drone base environment. a newly authorized site in the nation of niger will become the sixth u.s. drone base in africa, joining one in morocco, senegal, uganda, and a permanent one in djibouti. u.s. drone attacks ordered by obama have spiked particularly in yemen, somalia, afghanistan, and notably pakistan where over 360 drone strikes over the nine years, 2004 to 2013, have killed over 3,000 people. this data is not classified. and not even secret. but it is troubling. so troubling that the u.n. has just decided to launch an investigation on the impacts of drone strikes on thousands of civilians. question. will the u.n. human rights council rule that drone use violates international law do you think, pat buchanan? >> i don't think they l.
and extraordinary. tell me how you came to this book and what you hope for to us understanding about the future. >> well, thank you, charlie. you play a unique role in our country, i'm not buttering him up when i say i know you'll agreement i think you're the bester int interviewer that we have in our country, it's great to be with you. (applause) >> and i have thereby ruined every other interview that i will do for this book, i'm sure. i can't-- but thank you for all those kind words. and thank you all for coming. it's great to be back at the 92nd street y. i want to give a shout out to all of the folks at jccs around the country and those on the stair masters upstairs who are watching on the screen. i've always been fascinating by those who try to interpret the evidence compiled by expert communities that have relevance to our common future and i've focused on that in my ca reeferment i did that on climate in the digital world. about eight years ago i went to a conference in switzerland and somebody kd me what are the drivers of global change and i gave an answer, if you were asked you could
, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to reverberate from coast to coast. >> now! ifill: as gun-control activists push for stricter laws. and gun owners chafe against the prospect of new regulation, crossing for... causing for now an increase in sale in firearms and attendance at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufactur
of the right of girls to be educated. >> she said god has given her a second life and she will use it well. >> what an extraordinary young woman. as she continues to recover, today the taliban are the focus of talks in london between the leaders of pakistan and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done t
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)